Canning & Preserving: Canning Corn

Now if my children had their say, all the corn we eat would be corn on the cob!  Both my children have always loved corn on the  cob! 

The truth is, I have limited freezer space and although I did freeze about three dozen ears of corn, I had 12 dozen ears of corn and they were not going to fit. 

Canning is practical because once it is preserved, it requires no energy.  It is healthy and convenient! 

First start by picking your corn and you want it to be fresh and ripe. 

Procure a helper or two if possible to help remove all the corn husks.  It is more fun to do in pairs or groups but is rather messy, so the best place for this to be done is outside.  Do your best to remove all the fine hairs off the corn.

Corn can be processed two ways, by Hot Pack method or by Cold or Raw pack Method.  I personally prefer the cold or raw pack method myself.  

Either way, you want to begin by preparing your canning jars, lids and utensils.   Check your jars for any nicks or cracks along the edges that would prevent them from creating a proper seal. You will want to wash your jars in warm, soapy water along with your lids and bands.  You want your jars warmed when you fill them so leave your jars in hot water or run them through a heated cycle on your dishwasher to get the jars nice and hot. 

You can also heat them in your canner as you are preparing your canner.  Add 4-5 inches of water to your pressure canner.  Start heating the water just to a simmer.  (The amount of water added will vary depending on the type of canner you use).   

Place your lids in a small sauce pan with water on a low to medium heat.  This will prepare the seals.  Be careful to NOT BOIL the lids.  I also like to cover my countertops that I will be using with clean towels as I am pretty messy.  Now would also be the time to gather your funnel, lid lifter, spatula or other non-metallic instrument used to remove air bubbles and your jar lifters. 

Directions for a Raw or Cold Pack Method:

Wash your husked corn. 

Start a pot of boiling water to be added to fill your canning jars. 

Now is the real fun!  You need to cut off the kernels from the cob.  This is an easy, but messy job!  I cover my area I will be using and then use a cutting board.  Other’s prefer a cake pan or dish with sides.  I find either way, I still make a mess. 

  • Hold your corn up vertically and run your knife down the sides cutting off the kernels.
  • Do your best to not cut into the cob. You are encouraged to get about 3/4 of the kernel.  Some of the kernels will stick together in strips. 

Use your funnel and pack your corn loosely into your canning jars, do not pack down or shake.  Be sure to leave a 1” head space.  Add 1/2 teaspoon of salt per pint jar or 1 teaspoon of salt per quart jar. 

Add your boiling water to your jars, leaving a 1” head space. 

Using your non-metallic spatula, remove any air bubbles by using an up and down motion around the edges of the jar several times.

Use a damp, clean cloth to wipe the edges of the jar clean to ensure a good seal.

Remove your canning lid from your hot saucepan with your lid wand.  Place a screw band on and seal just finger tight. 

Directions for a Hot Pack Method:

Wash your husked corn. 

You need to cut off the kernels from the cob.  This is an easy, but messy job!  I cover my area I will be using and then use a cutting board.  Other’s prefer a cake pan or dish with sides.  I find either way, I still make a mess. 

  • Hold your corn up vertically and run your knife down the sides cutting off the kernels.
  • Do your best to not cut into the cob. You are encouraged to get about 3/4 of the kernel.  Some of the kernels will stick together in strips. 

Measure the amount of corn you have.  Add it to a large stockpot.  Add 1 teaspoon of salt and 2 cups of boiling water per quart of corn to your stockpot.  Boil for 3 minutes.

Using your jar lifter, remove one jar at a time to fill.  Using your funnel fill with corn, leaving 1” headspace.  Fill with boiling water, leaving 1” headspace. 

Using your non-metallic spatula, remove any air bubbles by using an up and down motion around the edges of the jar several times.

Use a damp, clean cloth to wipe the edges of the jar clean to ensure a good seal.

Remove your canning lid from your hot saucepan with your lid wand.  Place a screw band on and seal just finger tight. 

Processing Time:

The processing time will be the same, no matter what method you use.   After you fill each jar, place it into the pressure canner until all your jars are filled. 

Pint jars need to be processed for 55 minutes
Quart jars need to be processed for 1 hour 25 minutes

Adjustments for Pressure Canner 
Altitude in Feet Dial Gauge Canner Weighted Gauge Canner
0-1000 10 10
1001-2000 11 15
2001-4000 12 15
4001-6000 13 15
6001-8000 14 15
8000-10,000 15 15

Place your canner lid on and seal according to the manufacturer’s directions. 

Each pressure cooker again will be different, I have an older style but it works great! 

If you have may have either a weighted gauge or a dial gauge pressure  canner.  If you have a weighted gauge pressure canner like myself, you will not want to start your timer until the pressure builds to the point that your gauge starts to vent and the gauge jiggle.  My children say that it sounds like a choo-choo train.  At this point, lower your heat until the gauge only jiggles 2-3 times a minute.  On my cook stove I lower the heat to between 3-4 but each range will vary. 

If you have a dial presser canner, you will have a separate vent.  Leave your vent open until steam has escaped for about 10 minutes.  Close your vent. 

Process for the specified amount of time. 

Turn off your heat or remove your canner from the heat and allow the pressure to come down naturally. 

For the weighted gauge canner, this happens when you no longer hear the steam escaping the vent.  With a potholder or an oven mitt, remove the weighted gauge carefully as steam will continue to escape.  After it finishes, slowly remove the lid holding it at an angle away from your face to shield any possible steam still escaping. 

For a dial gauge, after the pressure ahs fallen to zero on the dial, wait at least 2 minutes and open the vent carefully.  next open your canner at an angle also to prevent steam from escaping. 

Remove your jars from the canner and place them on a towel in an area free of drafts.  Do nt tighten the bands.  Allow to cool at least 12 hours and remove the bands. 

Test the seal of each jar by pressing in the center of the lid.  If a proper vacuum seal has formed then the center of the lid will have a small indentation and will not spring back when pressed on with your finger.  If they do not seal well, then either place in the refrigerator to eat within a few days or re-process it. 

Store your jars without the bands in a cool, preferably dark place.

Comments

    • Amanda says

      I love to! Once I get going, it flows and is easy and I love looking in my cupboards at the food I have preserved!

  1. says

    Hey Amanda, what is the reasoning behind not boiling the lids? I have always boiled them, I thought we did that to sterilize them, but the last time I did pickles they got a whitish residue all over the lids. Could that be from boiling them?

    • Amanda says

      Janelle-in the past, I have boiled my lids and also had the whitish mineral residue on them. From talking with a master canner and the latest Ball/Kerr Canning Book I purchased, it clearly states not to. The process of heating them is really to prepare the seals not to sterilize them. If they are boiled for an extended time it can alter their ability to seal. I am experimenting with Tattler reusable lids right now and will let you know how it goes!

  2. says

    Wow, great how to on canning corn! I would have never thought to do that!! Our garden didn’t produce super well this year cause of this Kansas heat we have been having, but maybe next year!

    • Amanda says

      Well, neither did my garden Kelsey. We have also had unreal heat and very little rain, this was purchased but it is organic corn. It would not have been worth the money to have grown corn this year for me with the drought and what it would have cost to water, since corn needs 1″+ a week.

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